lancmaltby:

My pugs getting ready for Halloween - The Doctor and the TARDIS

lancmaltby:

My pugs getting ready for Halloween - The Doctor and the TARDIS

(via doctorwho)

doctorwho:

New official art released today: ‘The Eleven Doctors’

doctorwho:

New official art released today: ‘The Eleven Doctors’

trekkiefeminist:

Happy Birthday, Dr. Mae Jemison! (October 17)

Mae Jemison was the first black woman to travel in space, part of the crew of the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1992. Jemison has always had a connection to the arts, particularly dance and theatre, but of course she’s most noted for her scientific career.

Jemison entered Stanford at age 16, where she studied chemical engineering. Of her time there, Jemison has observed:

Some professors would just pretend I wasn’t there. I would ask a question and a professor would act as if it was just so dumb, the dumbest question he had ever heard. Then, when a white guy would ask the same question, the professor would say, “That’s a very astute observation.’”

She received her doctorate of medicine from Cornell in 1981 and served as a Peace Corps Medical Officer from 1983 to 1985. She was admitted into the astronaut training program in 1987 and finally went into space in 1992.

After leaving NASA in 1993 to found her own technology company, she got a chance to appear on Star Trek: The Next Generation’s “Second Chances” as Ensign Palmer. She was contacted by a mutual friend of hers and LeVar Burton’s, who told him about how much Jemison loved the show.

This made her the first real astronaut to appear on Trek, but it wasn’t her first interaction with Trek stars. Before going on the Endeavour in 1992 she called Nichelle Nichols to thank her for inspiring her as a child, and she promised that, in tribute, she would begin each shift by saying, “Hailing frequencies open.”

She got a chance to meet Nichelle again on the set of TNG (pictured above).

In 1996 she was interviewed in Stanford Today and said she feels responsibility to help pass on the kind of inspiration she got from role models like Nichelle Nichols/Uhura:

“Public figures can be images..Images of what other folks can be or how they might live their lives.”

(via scienceetfiction)

coolchicksfromhistory:

Sophia Brahe (1556-1643)
Art by Carolyn Bernhard (website, tumblr)
Tycho Brahe was one of the most important astronomers of the sixteenth century.  The last major astronomer to work without the aid of a telescope, Tycho built his own instruments to track the movements of celestial bodies.  His work paved the way for Johannes Kepler’s laws of planetary motion.
Tycho’s younger sister Sophia assisted him in his scientific observations.  Their family was part of Denmark’s high nobility and although the Brahe children were well educated, their parents did not consider science an appropriate field for people of rank.  Nevertheless, Sophia taught herself astronomy and as a teenager helped her brother observe a lunar eclipse.  Throughout their lives, Tycho and Sophia maintained a close correspondence. 
Sophia also studied alchemy, horticulture, and chemistry, but her most lasting individual work is her genealogy of Danish noble families.  Published in 1626, it remains an important source for Danish historians today.  

coolchicksfromhistory:

Sophia Brahe (1556-1643)

Art by Carolyn Bernhard (website, tumblr)

Tycho Brahe was one of the most important astronomers of the sixteenth century.  The last major astronomer to work without the aid of a telescope, Tycho built his own instruments to track the movements of celestial bodies.  His work paved the way for Johannes Kepler’s laws of planetary motion.

Tycho’s younger sister Sophia assisted him in his scientific observations.  Their family was part of Denmark’s high nobility and although the Brahe children were well educated, their parents did not consider science an appropriate field for people of rank.  Nevertheless, Sophia taught herself astronomy and as a teenager helped her brother observe a lunar eclipse.  Throughout their lives, Tycho and Sophia maintained a close correspondence. 

Sophia also studied alchemy, horticulture, and chemistry, but her most lasting individual work is her genealogy of Danish noble families.  Published in 1626, it remains an important source for Danish historians today.  

kidsneedscience:

Seventy years ago today on 20 February 1943, a cornfield in southern Mexico in the town of Paricutin erupted in a spectacular explosion and continued to shoot ash into the air for a year.  By the time it was finished, the cornfield had grown a cone of ash over a thousand feet high and covered ten square miles.  This explosion of gas, molten lava and solid ash is known as tephra, which is nothing more than the Anglicized version of the Ancient Greek word (tephra) which meant ash. This type of eruption is also known as a pyroclast or pyroclastic flow or even pyroclastic density current, which comes from the Ancient Greek words πῦρ (pur), meaning fire, and κλαστός (klastos), meaning broken in pieces.  
Image of the Paricutin Volcano during its first period of activity in 1943 courtesy of NOAA via wikipedia, used with permission under a Creative Commons 3.0 license.

kidsneedscience:

Seventy years ago today on 20 February 1943, a cornfield in southern Mexico in the town of Paricutin erupted in a spectacular explosion and continued to shoot ash into the air for a year.  By the time it was finished, the cornfield had grown a cone of ash over a thousand feet high and covered ten square miles.  This explosion of gas, molten lava and solid ash is known as tephra, which is nothing more than the Anglicized version of the Ancient Greek word (tephra) which meant ash. This type of eruption is also known as a pyroclast or pyroclastic flow or even pyroclastic density current, which comes from the Ancient Greek words πῦρ (pur), meaning fire, and κλαστός (klastos), meaning broken in pieces.  

Image of the Paricutin Volcano during its first period of activity in 1943 courtesy of NOAA via wikipedia, used with permission under a Creative Commons 3.0 license.

Common Writing Mistakes


everybodyilovedies:

amandaonwriting:

Benjamin Dreyer is the VP Executive Managing Editor & Copy Chief of Random House Publishing Group. Below is his list of the common stumbling blocks for authors, from A to X. 

  • One buys antiques in an antiques store from an antiques dealer; an antique store is a very old store.
  • He stayed awhile; he stayed for a while.
  • Besides is other than; beside is next to.
  • The singular of biceps is biceps; the singular of triceps is triceps. There’s no such thing as a bicep; there’s no such thing as a tricep.
  • blond man, a blond woman; he’s a blond, she’s a blonde.
  • capital is a city (or a letter, or part of a column); a capitol is a building.
  • Something centres on something else, not around it.
  • If you’re talking about a thrilling plot point, the word is climactic; if you’re discussing the weather, the word is climatic.
  • cornet is an instrument; a coronet is a crown.
  • One emigrates from a place; one immigrates to a place.
  • The word is enmity, not emnity.
  • One goes to work every day, or nearly, but eating lunch is an everyday occurrence.
  • flair is a talent; a flare is an emergency signal.
  • flier is someone who flies planes; a flyer is a piece of paper.
  • Flower bed, not flowerbed.
  • Free rein, not free reign.
  • To garner is to accumulate, as a waiter garners tips; to garnish (in the non-parsley meaning) is to take away, as the government garnishes one’s wages; a garnishee is a person served with a garnishment; to garnishee is also to serve with a garnishment (that is, it’s a synonym for “to garnish”).
  • gel is a jelly; it’s also a transparent sheet used in stage lighting. When Jell-O sets, or when one’s master plan takes final form, it either jells or gels (though I think the former is preferable).
  • Bears are grizzly; crimes are grisly. Cheap meat, of course, is gristly.
  • Coats go on hangers; planes go in hangars.
  • One’s sweetheart is “hon,” not “hun,” unless one’s sweetheart is Attila (not, by the way, Atilla) or perhaps Winnie-the-Pooh (note hyphens).
  • One insures cars; one ensures success; one assures people.
  • Lawn mower, not lawnmower.
  • The past tense of lead is led, not lead.
  • One loathes someone else but is loath to admit one’s distaste.
  • If you’re leeching, you’re either bleeding a patient with a leech or otherwise sucking someone’s or something’s lifeblood. If you’re leaching, you’re removing one substance from another by means of a percolating liquid (I have virtually no idea what that means; I trust that you do).
  • You wear a mantle; your fireplace has a mantel.
  • Masseurs are men; masseuses are women. Many otherwise extremely well educated people don’t seem to know this; I have no idea why. (These days they’re all called massage therapists anyway.)
  • The short version of microphone is still, so far as RH is concerned, mike. Not, ick, “mic.” [2009 update: I seem to be losing this battle. Badly. 2010 update: I’ve lost. Follow the author’s lead.]
  • There’s no such word as moreso.
  • Mucus is a noun; mucous is an adjective.
  • Nerve-racking, not -wracking; racked with guilt, not wracked with guilt.
  • One buys a newspaper at a newsstand, not a newstand.
  • An ordinance is a law; ordnance is ammo.
  • Palette has to do with colour; palate has to do with taste; a pallet is, among other things, something you sleep on. Eugene Pallette was a character actor; he’s particularly good in the 1943 film Heaven Can Wait.
  • Noun wise, a premier is a diplomat; a premiere is something one attends. “Premier” is also, of course, an adjective denoting quality.
  • That which the English call paraffin (as in “paraffin stove”), we Americans call kerosene. Copy editors should keep an eye open for this in mss. by British authors and query it. The term paraffin should generally be reserved for the waxy, oily stuff we associate with candles.
  • Prophecy is a noun; prophesy is a verb.
  • Per Web 11, it’s restroom.
  • The Sibyl is a seeress; Sybil is Basil Fawlty’s wife.
  • Please don’t mix somewhat and something into one murky modifier. A thing is somewhat rare, or it’s something of a rarity.
  • tick bites; a tic is a twitch.
  • Tortuous is twisty, circuitous, or tricky; torturous is painful, or painfully slow.
  • Transsexual, not transexual.
  • Troops are military; troupes are theatrical.
  • vice is depraved; a vise squeezes.
  • Vocal cords; strikes a chord.
  • A smart aleck is a wise guy; a mobster is a wiseguy.
  • X ray is a noun; X-ray is a verb or adjective.

I usually never reblog these bc I’m way too awesome to make mistakes, but omgosh there’s some I didn’t know here!!!

(via yahighway)